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Fountain Of Blessings
145 Country Club Drive
Tampa, FL 33612

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I will come to you and bless you in every place where I cause My name to be remembered. Ex. 20:24

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Saturday 11:00 a.m.

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Tuesday 7:00 p.m.

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Monthly Sunday 4:00 p.m.

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The LORD our God has secrets known to no one. We are not accountable for them, but we and our children are accountable forever for all that he has revealed to us, so that we may obey all the terms of these instructions.

What’s been happening at the Fountain?

Hanukkah

Hanukkah 2014 begins in the evening of Tuesday, December 16 and ends in the evening of Wednesday, December 24

We at Fountain of Blessings will be celebrating during our weekly services, and also with a concert at Acorn Trace Assisted Living, on December 12th, 7:00 pm

Often called the Festival of Lights, the holiday is celebrated with the lighting of the menorah, traditional foods, games and gifts. Ole! Oh what?

HISTORY OF HANUKKAH

Truth is, the events that inspired the Hanukkah holiday took place during a particularly turbulent phase of Jewish history. Around 200 B.C., Judea—also known as the Land of Israel—came under the control of Antiochus III, the Seleucid king of Syria, who allowed the Jews who lived there to continue practicing their religion. However, his son, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, proved less benevolent: he outlawed the Hebrew faith and ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. In 168 B.C., his soldiers descended upon Jerusalem, massacring thousands of people and desecrating the city’s holy Second Temple by erecting an altar to Zeus and sacrificing pigs within its sacred walls. An abomination to the Lord Almighty.

Did You Know?

The story of Hanukkah does not appear in the Torah because the events that inspired the holiday occurred after it was written. It is, however, mentioned in the New Testament, in which Jesus attends a "Feast of Dedication."

Led by the Jewish priest Mattathias and his five sons, a large-scale rebellion broke out against Antiochus and the Seleucid monarchy. When Matthathias died in 166 B.C., his son Judah, known as Judah Maccabee (“the Hammer”), took the helm; within two years the Jews had successfully driven the Syrians out of Jerusalem, relying largely on guerilla warfare tactics. Judah called on his followers to cleanse the Second Temple, rebuild its altar and light its menorah—the gold candelabrum whose seven branches represented knowledge and creation and were meant to be kept burning every night.

The Hanukkah “Miracle”

According to the Talmud, one of Judaism’s most central texts, Judah Maccabee and the other Jews who took part in the rededication of the Second Temple witnessed what they believed to be a miracle. Even though there was only enough untainted olive oil to keep the menorah’s candles burning for a single day, the flames continued flickering for eight nights, leaving them time to find a fresh supply. This wondrous event inspired the Jewish sages to proclaim a yearly eight-day festival. The first Book of the Maccabees describes an eight-day celebration that followed the rededication.
Maccabees


Added on November 20, 2014
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